Ads In Books: 1884? Try 960-1279, Sung China!

Ads In Books: 1884.

In 1973 in an article in The Library Quarterly and in her 1979 dissertation, Mingshen Pan (or Ming-Sun Poon) concludes from her examination of books during the Sung period that the colophon gradually changed in form, content, design, and placement,  demonstrating an increasing use of the colophon as an advertisement of the printer and his wares.   This shift embodied a critical transition in the printing trade of that time.   As support from governmental and private sources waned, support from diversified sources were sought in which the commercial element played a significant role.

Familiar?  As the European printing press began to make books available to a wider economic circle,  manuscript books ceased to be supported by commission and patronage. One of the earliest and famous printers of Venice, Aldus Manutius, reportedly printed only one commissioned book (Hypnerotomachia Poliphili, 1499); the rest had to make their way in the market.

In Sir Isaac Newton’s day, “Printers secured their livelihoods by advertising medicines, . . . Physicians told each other that if they want to market a new drug then they ought to go to the booksellers to do it.” Adrian Johns, Piracy (Chicago:  University of Chicago Press, 2009), pp. 84-85.

Publishing has always been marked (or marred) by the struggle to establish a stable business model.

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Bookmarking the evolution of the book
This entry was posted in Book Trade, Colophon, Future of the Book, History of the Book, Social Reading and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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